Research Group for ME/CFS, Chronic Disease, Aging and Cancer

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Food intake
« on: June 14, 2021, 01:31:23 PM »
I wonder where on the site I might find out what the details regarding the diet for starting out on the protocol.  Or is the food: whey protein, lecithin caps, and glucerna?  Is it possible to eat regular food?  Where would I learn about all this. Thanks. Perrier


Re: Food intake
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2021, 01:23:14 AM »
There's some info in the 3.2 protocol I just linked you on the other post.  However what you ideally need is a little writeup on the diet.  It's pretty straightforward to do but I do recommend you use https://cronometer.com/#diary to figure it out :)

I use that and it helps a lot!


Re: Food intake
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2021, 02:10:45 AM »
I wonder where on the site I might find out what the details regarding the diet for starting out on the protocol.  Or is the food: whey protein, lecithin caps, and glucerna?  Is it possible to eat regular food?  Where would I learn about all this. Thanks. Perrier

Hi Perrier, sorry for the confusion there's a link in the v3.3x schedule to an example diet for people who aren't restricted to using a feeding tube.

The baseline parameters are roughly [1g net carbs: 1g fat : 1g] protein for people who are fairly sedentary / immobile, after the initial induction phase, where we aim to deplete some stored glycogen, total energy intake and decrease oxidative stress, which is required to move forward.
 
Once people are able to be more active, the carbohydrates will need to be increased to match glycogen usage, however still maintaining lower GI carbs and a pseudo-diabetic approach to avoid blood glucose spikes.

These blood glucose spikes may be problematic if pancreatic GDH is high, as hyperinsulinism is then expected, adding to the excess energy issues described in the mitochondria for other cells.

Overall, "grazing" is suggested, rather than big, heavy meals.

Here's an image / link to the example diet.

Adjustments for tolerances / preferences can be made. eg. coffee / dairy aren't mandatory, just demonstrating that they're acceptable.

Bell peppers are included for hesperidin content, which works with the forskolin to improve cAMP levels. This assists normalise beta-oxidation of fatty acids and decreases neural GDH via cAMP modulating TrKB, BDNF.

Broccoli is included to assist with sulforphane intake and would be best consumed with radishes and / or mustardseed for myrosinase, which helps improve the sulforaphane content derived from that meal.

Sulforaphane is also included in the Life Extension Mix multi in v3,3. It's included to assist with increasing 3a-HSD, along with other ingredients.
Normalising 3a-HSD helps reduce DHT -> GDH and increase allopregnanolone.
 
NB. I am NOT a doctor and all information provided is for educational purposes only.

Please consult your physician before attempting anything you read here.


  • Calluna
  • New Member

    • 41

    • June 15, 2021, 07:32:59 AM
Re: Food intake
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2021, 03:17:47 PM »
The baseline parameters are roughly [1g net carbs: 1g fat : 1g] protein for people who are fairly sedentary / immobile, after the initial induction phase, where we aim to deplete some stored glycogen, total energy intake and decrease oxidative stress, which is required to move forward.
 
Once people are able to be more active, the carbohydrates will need to be increased to match glycogen usage, however still maintaining lower GI carbs and a pseudo-diabetic approach to avoid blood glucose spikes.
Is the 1:1:1 diet _the_ initial induction phase instead of the water fast, or is there a different specific alternative to the water fast? My family doesn't want to be around hangry Calluna for multiple days 😉


Re: Food intake
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2021, 02:47:11 AM »
The baseline parameters are roughly [1g net carbs: 1g fat : 1g] protein for people who are fairly sedentary / immobile, after the initial induction phase, where we aim to deplete some stored glycogen, total energy intake and decrease oxidative stress, which is required to move forward.
 
Once people are able to be more active, the carbohydrates will need to be increased to match glycogen usage, however still maintaining lower GI carbs and a pseudo-diabetic approach to avoid blood glucose spikes.
Is the 1:1:1 diet _the_ initial induction phase instead of the water fast, or is there a different specific alternative to the water fast? My family doesn't want to be around hangry Calluna for multiple days 😉
Hi! So there's an induction pathway described of performing an enhanced water fast for at least 3 days, which is then followed by jumping straight into the management protocol and 1:1:1 macros.

OR

Without the enhanced water fast, there's 4 days of even lower carb - 50-90g, which is intended to decrease oxidative stress and empty some of the stored glycogen, which then allows you some buffers to store carbs as glycogen again, as you move forward toward normality.

Somewhere around this time, you're also expecting a (typically) 4 day intense crash, as the purine nucleotide cycle restarts. This is because it creates a flood of backlogged ammonia. (I'll be describing this in much more detail, in one of the next posts.)

The "hangry effect" that people may be experiencing before the protocol is attributed to energy availability issues while fatty acid oxidation is impaired, just like a mild form of diabetes. You can't burn fat easily.

This causes your body to increase norepinephrine and cortisol secretion into your blood, which causes stress, also via another pathway called neuropeptide-Y.

The protocol addresses this by targeting the fatty acid oxidation pathway impairments (acetyl-CoA, cAMP) which means your body stops making unpleasant amounts of stress hormones in between meals and you have more energy, once you've settled in.

The intense immune response is expected to knock someone around enough in the early weeks that being "hangry" is likely seem going to be a non-issue.  

As your activity increases, more carbs will be needed to maintain glycogen stores - running out of glycogen is unpleasant, also.


  • kruidje
  • New Member

    • 1

    • February 17, 2022, 01:58:33 PM
Re: Food intake
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2022, 02:18:05 PM »
Doesn't the body make glucogen by itself from fats?


Re: Food intake
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2022, 08:38:03 PM »
Doesn't the body make glucogen by itself from fats?
Great question. You may find this useful reading - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279127/

Glucogen synthesis relies on a number of pathways which are often impaired with this metabolic cascade. 

Adrenergic signalling and precursors are often impaired, due to deficiencies of:
P5P or precursors ([Any form of B6, including P5P, minus the phosphate group] -> riboflavin / zinc / magnesium -> P5P),
copper,
iron,
BH4.

These can be expected to be causal in many of the symptoms.

PS. Apologies for the delayed response. This forum has been quite inactive for a few months. The Discord server chatter is ramping up again.